October 7th, 2019

Jeanette Mundt at Overduin & Co.

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Artist: 
Jeanette Mundt

Venue: Overduin & Co., Los Angeles

Exhibition Title: If the Devil Could Kill You Right Now He Would

Date: September 8 – October 26, 2019

Click here to view slideshow

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Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Overduin & Co., Los Angeles 

Press Release:

Overduin & Co. is pleased to present a solo exhibition of paintings by Jeanette Mundt titled “If the Devil Could Kill You Now He Would.” The artist made sixteen paintings for the exhibition, twelve of which are on view: six gymnast paintings, three of Princess Diana, one abstraction, and a couple of paintings of poppies. All of the paintings on view are in oil over preliminary graphite drawings, four of the works are on primed linen and eight are on white-gessoed canvas. Most of the paintings are on metal stretchers, some are on wood.

The paintings of gymnasts are specifically of members of the US women’s gymnastics team, “The Final Five”, that won the team event of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro in 2016. There are works from two series featuring the athletes included in the show: one from the Born Athlete American series (this is an on-going series with eight paintings in it to date, four of which are included in the 78th Whitney Biennial curated by Jane Panetta and Rujeko Hockley, and hanging on the fifth floor of the museum) and five are from the Born Individual series (this is also an on-going series with nine paintings in it to date). The Born Athlete American series is based on sequences of photographs taken by Bedel Saget of the athletes’ movements through routines and combined by Sergio Pecanha, Jeremy White, and Jon Huang to create images of multiple views of the same body sequentially overlaid to show the exact workings of this body as it moved through time and space. These images were published in the New York Times in August of 2016. The works in the Born Individual series are based on photographs of the athletes mid-routine, taken from above. Various painterly gestures were employed suggesting the idea of movement.

There are seven paintings in the on-going series based on the iconic photograph taken by paparazzi of Princess Diana sitting on the end of the diving board of her boyfriend’s father’s yacht on the Emerald Coast near Sardinia in 1997. The works move towards abstraction, but can’t quite commit. Most of the paintings in this series are on linen primed with matte medium, one is on fine Belgian linen primed with a lead-based oil.

There are some paintings of poppies and one painting of Jesus Christ during the Passion, covered by a layer of at-times-opaque blend of Persian Rose and Flake White.

All of the paintings are about painting, about depiction, correction, construction, about social constructions, expectations of females, Americans, American females, American female athletes, American female painters, female painters, artists, Francis Bacon, Bonnie Camplin, Janiva Ellis, Terrance Hayes, Bettina Funcke, Adrian Ghenie, Wadé Guyton, Han Kang, Karen Kilimnik, Lucy McKenzie, Edward Muybridge, Gerhard Richter, Leni Riefenstahl, Geraldine Roth, Ned Vena, et alia.

Jeanette Mundt (b. 1982, USA) lives and works in New York, NY. Mundt completed her graduate degree at Rutgers University in New Jersey and her undergraduate degree at Pratt Institute in New York. Mundt’s work is currently on view in the 2019 Whitney Biennial and solo exhibitions have been organized by Société in Berlin; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, Bridget Donahue, and Off Vendome in New York; and the Green Gallery in Milwaukee. Mundt’s work has also been included in group exhibitions organized by the New Museum in New York; G2 Kunsthalle in Leipzig, Germany; as well as “Painting: Now and Forever, Part III,” organized by Greene Naftali and Matthew Marks Gallery in New York; and “The Vitalist Economy of Painting,” curated by Isabelle Graw at Galerie Neu in Berlin.

Link: Jeanette Mundt at Overduin & Co.

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